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  #1  
Old 03-10-2009, 11:25 PM
kbechtler kbechtler is offline
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I leave for OSUT on April 8th and could use some help. The only problem I'm having is running long distances. i already can score a 100 on push ups and 100 on sit ups on the afpt and i can sprint just fine. but when i run say 2 miles i find my legs exhausted after one mile and i start to slow down. if it werent for my legs getting tired i could run 4 or 5 miles before getting winded. my question is does anyone have any idea how i can build my legs up besides just running because its the only thing i'm worried about going in.
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  #2  
Old 03-11-2009, 08:11 AM
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MSG Glenn MSG Glenn is offline
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For the Army's PT test you only have to run 2 miles. It's good that you're running greater distances because then 2 miles will seem short but unless you're going into the Rangers or Special Forces there's no need to do 4 or 5 miles except to build up stamina. Maybe do a 4 miler once a week when you can get a passing score at 2 miles. When doing 4 miles try to maintain your 2 mile pace. In other words getting a passing score on each 2 mile leg. Another thing you could try is go 4 miles slowly with a half mile sprint every mile.

Other ways to increase leg strength are walking long distance & bicycling. Swimming is good, too. My contention is if you want to increase speed & distance in your runs then the best exercise is running. Run only every other day. Give your legs time to recover on your off days. On those days concentrate on push-ups, sit-ups & pull-ups & other upper body PT.

Make sure you stretch thoroughly before doing any exercise & warm up before stretching to get your muscles limber & your heart rate up. Do jumping jacks, run in place for a minute, walk 5 minutes & then start your stretches. To help avoiding shin splints put the front part of your foot on a slight elevation like a curb with your heel lower on the ground & slowly bend forward. Include this in your stretching exercises.
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  #3  
Old 03-14-2009, 10:54 PM
Ripper Ripper is offline
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I wouldn't say it is your legs you have to really worry about. At OSUT you will have plenty of time to exercise your legs, both during PT, and if they elect to open the track at alternate times for further training. For instance, after red phase, the track was opened up for two hours on Sunday nights for training. Also, during the running exercises of PT, you will be classed into different groups based on speed. A is the fastest group, D is the slowest. The objective is to move into at least B group, with A group being preferable. When you first go "down range" you will run two-miles and put into a group based on your time. There are also ruck marches and four-mile pace runs, so your legs get plenty of exercise.

It is a good idea to focus on your stamina. As you will hear at OSUT "The only way to become faster is to run faster", with the idea being the faster you run, the less chance your legs have to become tired. Also you will learn about your mind, and how to use your mind to push your body, even if your legs are sore. Honestly, most of the people I saw falling out of runs were from being winded as opposed to the legs giving out.

You have to run two miles in a certain time to graduate, and to make your 36-hour pass. Try not to focus on your legs, focus as if you are running to something. During PT, I focused as if I were "running to chow" at breakfast chow follows PT. During my 36-hour pass, I focused on running to achieve that pass. For graduation, focus as if you were literally running to graduate.

If you don't come to OSUT up to par, you will be trained so that you become better. You are not expected to be 100% right off the bat. Also, I advise you not to take steps as some guys do to get a profile. They are allowed to walk the two miles, and given a rather long time to do so. That may be an easy way, but it's not the honorable one.

Stay focused, stay hydrated, stay motivated!
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  #4  
Old 03-15-2009, 12:14 AM
kbechtler kbechtler is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2009
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oh no i will most definetly run. walking is not an option at all. the good thing is im running hills by my house and one week in i can already feel my legs getting stronger. as far as getting winded...i could run 5 miles without breathing too heavy. i've just always been more of a sprinter but hopefully the hills help. i do have a little over 3 more weeks until i leave so that should be enough time.
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  #5  
Old 03-15-2009, 06:05 PM
shorty32 shorty32 is offline
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Just keep running it is the best way to get your legs stronger and like ripper said when you get to your osut you will have plenty of time to get your legs stronger wether you want to or not
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