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  #1  
Old 01-02-2006, 07:32 AM
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Texas Texas is offline
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Default Nuclear power?

Now that Russia has shown it's true intention of not becoming a democracy ,and its readiness to use Gas as a political weapon .Should the industrialised countries of Europe face the fact that an alternative power source is required ? Why should we allow ourselves to be blackmailed by a dictator in Moscow . There is only one energy source that can handle this requirement . Nuclear power ! I think we(the rest of Europe ) should go the way the French have(80% nuclear) and give the Bully in Moscow the Finger !
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  #2  
Old 01-02-2006, 08:53 AM
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Hi Texas and Happy New Year !

Wednesday November 23, 2005 The Guardian
[URL="http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1648424,00.html"]At last Blair seems to see that our future is nuclear[/URL]

August 2005
[URL="http://www.uic.com.au/nip28.htm"]French Nuclear Power Program[/URL]
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  #3  
Old 01-02-2006, 12:25 PM
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torspo[fin] torspo[fin] is offline
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hmh. we are building our fifth nuclear powerplant, and there are some who are
already planing for the sixth. we were wondering that something like this
would happen around 2000-2001 when we saw the slow rising in the
Russian economy.
Russia holds like 1/3 of the worlds earth/natural gas
sources, which will last about 50+ years with present consuption rate.
its unfortunate that the Russia now uses gas as a political weapon.
but its not unheared of. i could imagine there has been that
samekind of game in the west sometime in the past when
some small country has turned its back on the U.S. for example.
and we all know U.S. is very quick to point its fingers to some country which
might not be "politically correct" from the western point of view.
this usually leads to some sort of trade enbargo or over lucrative
business deals with the foregin land. which ofcorse usually suffers from
from the deal, but what can they do?

so what the Russia basicly went and did was a gas enbargo of its own.

we have fairly good relations with Russia, and we get our naturalgas
(suprise) from them. we haven't had any real problems with
gas imports with Russia. tough our main gas pipes are not from
the same main pipes that go to Ukraine and there to the rest of the
europe. the Russians have their "thing" going on again.
we have had quite a few experiences about their
political or/and business behavior. which can look and
sound erratic and totaly odd at times. otherwise its
mostly good. Their democracy is very young.
and the divide between rich and poor is unbelevible.
think about it.. gazprom is a monopoly in a country
which is the biggest in the world! has the biggest
natural gas supplyes in the world!

what do they really care? they have enough money
for their own private army. but it would be bad for business. i wouldn't be suprised if Putin
had made those "proposals" because it would seem
like he has the country in control. which would
be essential for keeping he's government together.
there are ultra rich and ultra poor there (far more poor than rich).
not much in between. thats what capitalism makes from a country which
has had totally different system. and gazprom claims they didnt know anything
about Putins proposal forehand. oh well. might be.

well anyhows, as i said, we are building our fifth nuclear powerplant, sixth is
already tought about, and the future applications to make energy are looking
promising (burncells etc).

Last edited by torspo[fin]; 01-02-2006 at 12:38 PM..
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  #4  
Old 01-02-2006, 05:09 PM
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Happy new year JIM and Torspo!

Because of Finlands geographic position and past history with Russia . I'm sure Finland knows exactly which path to choose

For obvious reasons, I want to secure and find alternative methods of Power for my own country and Europe .Because I find it blatently obvious that Russia is not Democratic and wants to regain its position in the world ASAP as a major player.Under this Russian leader this can only bring about Political and economic warfare of the kind we see demonstrated in the Ukraine at the moment . I'm not impressed if this is Putins idea of a level playing field .
We already have the fascade of the Yukos oil company . How many more examples do we need to realise that Putin is a Dictator in the making ?

I here what you say about the US using economic sanctions etc . But we are European and must stand up to this Bully in Moscow !
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  #5  
Old 01-03-2006, 05:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas
Happy new year JIM and Torspo!

Because of Finlands geographic position and past history with Russia . I'm sure Finland knows exactly which path to choose

For obvious reasons, I want to secure and find alternative methods of Power for my own country and Europe .Because I find it blatently obvious that Russia is not Democratic and wants to regain its position in the world ASAP as a major player.Under this Russian leader this can only bring about Political and economic warfare of the kind we see demonstrated in the Ukraine at the moment . I'm not impressed if this is Putins idea of a level playing field .
We already have the fascade of the Yukos oil company . How many more examples do we need to realise that Putin is a Dictator in the making ?

I here what you say about the US using economic sanctions etc . But we are European and must stand up to this Bully in Moscow !

i agree with you completely texas................but there are too many people in power who are cowards not willing to stand up to comrade oh i mean "president" putin........many people would disagree with me but i think that russia is well on its way of being a communist
nation again especially under that ex KGB *****head
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  #6  
Old 01-03-2006, 08:53 AM
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Russia doesn't have really a great democratic experience and the transition from a planned economy towards a market economy it's made too quickly with disastrous consequences but paradoxically maybe Putin is the right man to maintain this great country and incarnates a transition from a totalitarian system towards a democratic system, a compromise to some extent?
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  #7  
Old 01-03-2006, 12:33 PM
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Khodorkovsky: an oligarch undone
By Jeremy Scott-Joynt
BBC News business reporter

Russian oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky recently suffered the ultimate indignity in the world of the super-wealthy.
He has been ousted from the top spot in Forbes magazine's Russian Rich List by Roman Abramovich, a fellow energy tycoon whose main claim to fame outside Russia is as owner of London football club Chelsea.
But that is hardly his only source of dismay.
After a trial lasting 11 months, the former owner of oil giant Yukos has now been sentenced to nine years in prison.
Also on trial was Mr Khodorkovsky's business partner Platon Lebedev, who was also jailed for nine years.

How did it come to this?

Rags to riches to rags
Only a few years ago, Mr Khodorkovsky was on top of his game, sitting on assets estimated to be worth upwards of $15bn.
Yukos was Russia's second biggest oil company, pumping one in every five barrels the country produced.
Like the rest of Russia's class of super-rich businessmen, Mr Khodorkovsky had profited from the string of cut-price privatisations launched in the mid-1990s.
After running a computer import business under the wing of the Communist Party's youth movement in the 1980s and starting Menatep bank in 1987, he used the proceeds to buy up state assets.
One was fertiliser company Apatit, which he acquired in 1994.
A year later he snapped up Yukos for $300m, with Menatep assuming $2bn in debt.
At its peak the oil firm set its own worth at more than $20bn.
It is not worth as much now - after a tax audit, Yukos is facing back tax bills for billions of US dollars, has had its assets seized and its most productive unit acquired at a bargain rate by state-owned oil firm Rosneft.

Loopholes
Mikhail Khodorkovsky's problem is that becoming one of the oligarch class can be a murky business.
The 1990s privatisations involved an implied obligation. New owners of Russia's prize assets - including its media - would get the wealth; but could not oppose the Kremlin.
Mr Khodorkovsky started out following the loyal route, even serving as deputy fuel and oil minister under President Boris Yeltsin.
But he eventually began to fund political parties - his cash went to almost every party, including the Communists - increasing su****ions that he might have political ambitions of his own.
His acquisition of the rights to publish the Moskovskiye Novosti newspaper and his hiring of a well-known investigative journalist critical of President Vladimir Putin lent weight to this impression.
Shortly before elections in 2003, fellow Yukos shareholder Platon Lebedev was arrested for fraud in a move widely regarded as a warning to Mr Khodorkovsky to keep out of politics.
But Mr Khodorkovsky did not heed the warning. Four months later, armed security forces took him off his private jet at an airport in Siberia. He has been behind bars ever since.
Criminal or political?
Mr Khodorkovsky's supporters have always insisted the trial was an attempt by President Putin's administration to silence a potential rival.
The Kremlin hotly denies the accusation - although Economy Minister German Gref told the BBC in June 2004 that the trial had "a certain political element".
He implied Mr Khodorkovsky had stepped out of line, and his past behaviour provided plenty of ammunition for criminal charges.
One of the central planks of the government case was the privatisation of Apatit. Mr Khodorkovsky promised massive investment at the time, which later failed to materialise.
Prosecutors said this was fraud - as was the use of networks of offshore and dummy companies to acquire shares in sold-off state enterprises.
Khodorkovsky supporters say the case is about politics
There is also the tax case against Yukos. Russian law makes shareholders financially responsible for corporate misdeeds, but assigns criminal liability to company officers.
Mikhail Khodorkovsky was both, and has therefore lost billions along with facing corporate, and personal, tax evasion charges.
Firing line!
He is not the first tycoon to face the Kremlin's wrath.
In the late 1980s another computer importer, Communist Party apparatchik Artyom Tarasov, was prosecuted for "economic crimes" and - despite being acquitted - had his business ruined.
Boris Berezovsky was another beneficiary of the 1990s state sell-offs, but his media channels started to criticise the Kremlin.
He is now a refugee in London facing charges should he return home.
But the assault on the oligarch class has been highly selective.
Most remain untouched even though many share a similar trajectory to wealth and power. Mr Abramovich, for instance, is governor of a remote Siberian state - but has kept out of national politics.
And President Putin's "State of the Nation" speech on 25 April held out the promise that the tax authorities would be reined in.
Now that both Mr Khodorkovsky and Mr Lebedev have been convicted, they may find that few of their former rivals end up meeting the same fate.

This is not democracy !
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  #8  
Old 01-03-2006, 12:45 PM
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a democracy in Russian manner not our or a soft dictatorship
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  #9  
Old 01-03-2006, 01:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim76
a democracy in Russian manner not our or a soft dictatorship
I understand what you are saying Jim . A soft Dictatorship?? ,very good lol
Is this possible ?
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Last edited by Texas; 01-03-2006 at 07:05 PM..
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  #10  
Old 01-03-2006, 07:13 PM
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Putins Russia is not heading toward communisn nor anything like democracy. Russia is teetering on the edge of being a fascist-capitalist state, along the lines of Mussolinis Italy.
As far as nuclear civil power is concerned, I agree completely with Tex that the UK needs to build the new generation of reactors fast, and many more than proposed.
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